Articles Posted in Mutual Funds

https://www.californiasecuritiesfraudlawyerblog.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/393/2016/11/sec-crest.bin_-300x202.jpgOn February 28, 2018, the Securities Exchange Commission (“SEC”) announced the settlement of charges against Ameriprise for recommending high-fee mutual fund shares to their customers when less expensive share classes were available from the same mutual fund.  As part of the settlement, Ameripise will pay a fine of $230,000 “without admitting or denying” the SEC’s findings of malfeasance.  According to the SEC’s investigation, more than 1,700 customer accounts were charged $1,778,592 in unnecessary mutual fund fees and charges.  Unfortunately, investors will not be entitled to any restitution under the terms of the SEC’s settlement.  Affected investors, however, are free to pursue their own remedies—usually through the filing of a securities arbitration matter before the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”).

Ameriprise’s Conduct Amounted to Securities Fraud

As an investment advisor, Ameriprise is subject to both the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 and the Securities Act of 1933.  According to the SEC’s findings, Ameriprise willfully violated Sections 17(a)(2) & 17(a)(3) of the Securities Act by engaging in a course of business that operates as a fraud or deceit upon its customers and by omitting or failing to disclose material facts to its customers.  Specifically, Ameriprise failed to provide its customers with material information regarding the compensation they received for selling more expensive mutual fund shares such as Class A shares that carried up-front sales charges or Class B and C shares with contingent deferred sales charges (“CDSCs”) and higher internal fees and expenses.  More importantly, Ameriprise failed to disclose that the firm would earn increased revenue when customers these more expensive mutual fund shares. As noted by the SEC, “information about this cost structure would accordingly be important to a reasonable investor.”

Although my earlier blog posting about securities arbitration results in San Francisco was less rosy, today’s Wall Street Journal article, “Investors Win More Broker Cases,” did contain a bit of encouraging news for brokerage firm customers who may be considering whether to file a securities arbitration claim. The article noted that customers who went all the way to hearing before the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) have prevailed 45% of the time so far this year compared to just 37% in 2007. In other words, investors are winning a larger percent of cases than they did in the past, but they are still losing 65% of the time. The WSJ article also noted that awards to investors for claims under $1 million were averaging about 50% of the damages requested.

[Blogger’s note: See my year-end update, “Securities Arbitration Award Results for 2009 Better Than Expected for San Francisco Investors”]

Most Investor Claims Involve Mutual Funds